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Macmillan Cancer

Macmillan Cancer Support
One in three of us will get cancer and it’s the toughest thing most of us will ever face. If you’ve been diagnosed with cancer, or a loved one has, you’ll want a team of people in your corner supporting you every step of the way. Macmillan provide practical, medical and financial support and push for better cancer care.

Marie Curie Cancer Care

Marie Curie Cancer Care is a UK charity dedicated to the care of people with terminal cancer and other illnesses. Over the financial year 2010/11, we reached a total of 31,799 patients

Youth Health Talk

YouthHealthTalk
Youthhealthtalk enables young people, their family and friends, and professionals such as doctors and teachers to understand young people's experiences of health, illness and life in general. The website feature real-life accounts of issues such as effect on work and education, social life and relationships, consulting health professionals and treatment.

Rabies

Advice for travellers

 Rabies is transmitted following contact with the saliva from an infected wild or domestic animal (including bats in some countries) often via a bite, or a lick to an open wound. Human rabies is nearly always fatal.

The risk of exposure is increased by type of activity (e.g. running, cycling), occupation (e.g. veterinarians) and long duration of stay. Children are at increased risk, as they are more likely to have animal contact and may not report a bite, scratch or lick.

All travellers to rabies risk areas should avoid contact with any wild and domestic animals, including pets. Pre-exposure vaccination should be given to adults and children at increased risk of rabies or who are travelling to remote areas where medical care and post-exposure prophylaxis with rabies vaccine and rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) may not be available.

Following an animal bite, wounds must be thoroughly washed and an urgent medical assessment sought, even if the wound appears trivial. Prompt post-exposure treatment is necessary, even if pre-exposure vaccine has been received. Suitable vaccines and immunoglobulin are in short supply or unavailable in many areas of the world. In some locations, a flight back to the UK or to a medical centre in a nearby country may be necessary in order to obtain vaccine.

Travellers should ensure that they have comprehensive travel insurance and that it will cover them should they require medical evacuation.

Health care providers can contact the Health Protection Agency Virus Reference Division through the duty doctor system at Colindale for guidance in managing potential rabies exposures in returned travellers.

Advice for travellers

The occurrence of rabies in Indonesia, including Bali, is a reminder of the importance of rabies prevention for travellers in many regions of the world. Rabies is transmitted following contact with the saliva from an infected wild or domestic animal (including bats in some countries) often via a bite, or a lick to an open wound. Human rabies is nearly always fatal.

The risk of exposure is increased by type of activity (e.g. running, cycling), occupation (e.g. veterinarians) and long duration of stay. Children are at increased risk, as they are more likely to have animal contact and may not report a bite, scratch or lick.

All travellers to rabies risk areas should avoid contact with any wild and domestic animals, including pets. Pre-exposure vaccination should be given to adults and children at increased risk of rabies or who are travelling to remote areas where medical care and post-exposure prophylaxis with rabies vaccine and rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) may not be available.

Following an animal bite, wounds must be thoroughly washed and an urgent medical assessment sought, even if the wound appears trivial. Prompt post-exposure treatment is necessary, even if pre-exposure vaccine has been received. Suitable vaccines and immunoglobulin are in short supply or unavailable in many areas of the world, including Bali. In some locations, a flight back to the UK or to a medical centre in a nearby country may be necessary in order to obtain vaccine.

Travellers should ensure that they have comprehensive travel insurance and that it will cover them should they require medical evacuation.

Health care providers can contact the Health Protection Agency Virus Reference Division through the duty doctor system at Colindale for guidance in managing potential rabies exposures in returned travellers on 020 8200 4400.

References 

1. PROMED mail. Rabies – Human: Indonesia (Bali). 21 February 2011. [Accessed 22 February 2011]. Available at: http://apex.oracle.com/pls/otn/f?p=2400:1001:813966184771939::NO::F2400_P1001_BACK_PAGE,F2400_P1001_PUB_MAIL_ID:1010,87195

939::NO::F2400_P1001_BACK_PAGE,F2400_P1001_PUB_

MAIL_ID:1010,87195

2. Ministry of Health of Indonesia, Bali, Nias Dan Maluku Tenggara Barat Terjadi KLB Rabies (In Indonesian). 5 February 2011. [Accessed 22 February 2011]. Available at: http://www.depkes.go.id/index.php/berita/press-release/1401-bali-nias-dan-maluku-tenggara-barat-terjadi-klb-rabies.html

3.The Bali International Medical Centre (BIMC), Bali – Rabies Update, 5 October 2010. [Accessed 22 February 2011]. Available at: http://www.bimcbali.com/news-update/bali-rabies-update.html

 

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